Pt 2 of My Preview of “Cultivating a Gospel-Shaped Attitude.”

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Below is the second part of my preview of the first chapter of my new book “Cultivating a Gospel Shaped Attitude.”  If you did not read Part 1, please click here first, so that you can read my first post in this series.  Then I would ask you to do three things to help me spread the news about my book.

Click here to read Part 1 of this series

 

1 .) Purchase a copy for yourself– if you live in near Metropolis, IL just stop by First Baptist Church this Sunday and buy a copy.  If you live outside of my local area you can order the book by clicking here or through Amazon.com.  Please remember that during the month of May all the profits from the sale of the book are going to be donated to the Haiti Missions Fund at First Baptist Church to help feed orphans.  

 

CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOUR COPY

 

2.) Spread the word– share the links to this blog on your Facebook and Twitter accounts.  This is the single best way to help me get the word out about the book.  So please take a moment to share it right now.

 

3.) Pray for the release of the book– that may might sound strange but I earnestly believe that the ideas for this book was given to me by God and that the Spiritual truth that you will find in it can be life changing.  Pray for God to use this book in countless numbers of lives.

 

BELOW IS THE SECOND PORTION OF CHAPTER 1.  BE SURE TO COME BACK TOMORROW FOR THE SECOND INSTALLMENT:

 

Attitude Shapes Character

 

Our attitude refers to the way we evaluate other people, our circumstances, and ourselves. More fundamentally, our attitudes determine how we make decisions; therefore, they exhibit a strong effect upon our behavior. We’ve all seen children, for instance, who exhibit a bad attitude when told not to do something and then react by making a bad decision. When I was about nine years old, my younger brother, Ron, received a pool table as a birthday present. One night while playing pool, I developed a bad attitude because Ron had beaten me three or four games in a row. At the time, I was convinced he must have been cheating—perhaps by telepathically altering the course of the balls as they crossed the table—and the next thing I knew, my anger erupted and I broke one of his pool cues over my knee. My bad attitude led to a bad decision, which resulted in even a worse consequence when my dad came rushing into the room. Do you see how my attitude affected my decision-making? My decision in this situation was directly related to the way I viewed my brother and the circumstances of the game.

While this story represents one single episode in the course of my life, it raises an important question. What would have happened had I continued to cultivate this attitude? How would people describe my character if, over the course of time, I continued to exhibit this same attitude and repeatedly made these kinds of rash decisions? Eventually, I would have developed a reputation for being a hothead, and people would start to think of me as being ill tempered. My actions, which were driven by my attitude, would eventually come to define my character. This is why I argue that in Matthew 5:1–11, Jesus is talking about our attitudes rather than our character. Attitudes are more fundamental than character. Any change in our character must begin with a change in our attitudes. This is why I say that a gospel-shaped attitude leads to Christ-honoring actions that when exhibited over time will result in a Christlike character. The end result is a life conformed to the character of Christ, but it all starts with our attitude.

The apostle Paul summarized this pattern of spiritual formation in Philippians 2:5–8 when he said, “Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.”[1] The word mind in this passage could also be translated as “attitude.” In essence, Paul uses the word mind to describe how Jesus viewed Himself and other people: He saw Himself as a servant and other people as being in great spiritual need. Jesus’ attitude resulted in definitive actions; He “made himself nothing, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.” In other words, Jesus’ attitude resulted in specific actions, which in turn came to define His character. This is the basic formula for all spiritual growth and maturity.

But let me be clear, Jesus is not talking about some kind of flaky positive thinking or health-and-wealth philosophy. He is not suggesting that we refuse to accept reality by viewing life through rose-colored glasses. Instead, Jesus is urging us to view life through the lens of the gospel. Simply put, the gospel is the good news that Jesus Christ, the Son of God, paid the penalty for our sins by His death on the cross. He was buried and rose triumphantly from the grave, so that anyone who will repent of his or her sin and believe in Him will receive the forgiveness of sin and be reconciled to God. The more deeply we reflect on the glory and majesty of the gospel message, the more we recognize how it permeates every area of our life and ministry. As we work our way through the Beatitudes, we will discover how each of these attitudes is deeply grounded in the gospel and how together they provide a comprehensive picture of knowing Jesus and developing a Christlike character.

 


[1] All scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version (Wheaton: Crossway, 2001).

 

 

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